u0g8m159.jpg (29466 bytes)U0G8M159S.jpg (38415 bytes)Guro (Gouro, Gwio, Kweni, Lo, Lorube), Cte d’Ivoire

Elephant mask. The Guro of the Central Cote d’Ivoire numbering about 200,000 are one of indigenous tribes of the area who were forced to retreat onto the jungles by the invasion from Ghana of the Baule people. The Guro are related by language and culture to their western neighbors, the Bete and Dan, yet their art has greater affinity with that of the Baule and Yohure to the east. The Guro farm predominantly cotton, rice, coffee, and cocoa - the men clear the fields and the women plant. Village life is regulated by a council of elders, representing each main family, and by secret societies. The daily life is dominated by secret societies and by a belief in protective spirits, to whom the Guro used to build shrines and figures. The Guro have a very pronounced artistic sense.  The elephant masks are used in ceremonial dances during different festivals.

Material:  wood.

Size:   H. 15”, W. 6”, D. 6”